Do attractive people use online dating

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Do less attractive people think the people they date (who also tend to be less attractive) delude themselves into thinking their dates are more physically attractive?

According to new research, the answer is “no.”You remember that website that used to be popular, HOTor NOT.com, which allows visitors to rate the attractiveness of random, anonymous photographs, right?

Ok Cupid found that when some men think a woman is ugly, other men are more likely to message them.

This is partly because they have unusual features that may divide opinion, but also because men think there is less competition While Holly Willoughby (left) is often described as beautiful, Sarah Jessica Parker (right) tends to get a varied response.

These data were taken from a 10-day period in the summer of 2005.

The two data sets allowed the researchers to first determine whether individuals perceived as less attractive by others are more willing to date others who are also perceived as less attractive, and second to see whether people’s own attractiveness affects their ratings of others’ attractiveness.

While women may get an ego boost when they receive 30-100 messages in any given week, nobody really wishes to have that much admin to sift through.

And when 80% of the messages are either, you can’t really blame them for not responding to most messages—even if you personalize your mails.

For reasons not entirely clear, we all tend to gravitate to our own level of attractiveness (as well as socio-economic class, race, and social circles).From childhood, men have been brought up to be fierce competitors, to opt for the most risky jobs, to put themselves on the line, to accept rejection “like a man” and to always make the first move.This product of social conditioning rears its ugly head online even more so, as an average of seven men compete for the attention of one woman.And since beauty seems to be a universal constant no matter what the culture (based upon factors such as facial features and waist to hip ratios), it’s hard to get away from the influence of attractiveness in dating and mating.Some theories that have been put forward about why these biases exist include evolutionary (helps to maximize the attractive, more “fit” genes), market forces (attractive people want other attractive people, so they’re not left choosing from the less attractive), and parental influence (we look for mates who resemble our parents! The current study touches upon a psychological mumbo-jumbo theory called “cognitive dissonance.” When a person chooses someone they believe to be less attractive than themselves, they must try and reduce the internal conflict regarding this choice.

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